Image from Pipe Bag, Minneconjou Lakota ca. 1885

The Siouan Languages Bibliography

Page last updated:
06/13/2001

Image from Pipe Bag, Minneconjou Lakota ca. 1885
Welcome to the Siouan Languages Bibliography, a work in progress! The purpose of this web site is to bring together in one place a searchable bibliography of all the linguistic and language related work done on the Siouan-Catawban languages. This project would not have been possible without the effort of a lot of people. The basis for this bibliography was one complied by Pamela Munro and then passed to Robert Rankin and then to me. Pam's bibliography was the foundation for the one posted here. I was then provided with individual vitae's from Robert Rankin, John Koontz and Randolph Graczyk which added many papers that are floating around out there. Sources were then added from Marianne Mithun's wonderful bibliography in "The Languages of Native North America". Currently, I'm adding many older sources from a bibliography created by Douglas Parks and Robert Rankin. When these are added, this bibliography will be close to complete.

This bibliogrpahy now stands at 632 references, up from 551.

I'd like to thank The Chicago Linguistic Society for providing a small grant which helped immensely with the creation of The Siouan Languages Bibliography. Much of the initial data entry was done by Phillip R. Potamites, to whom I owe a great deal of thanks. His knowledge of Endnotes really helped this project become a reality. Lastly, I would like to thank Raymond Bucko, whose interest in this project really spurred it to completion (at least partial completion), and of course for posting it on his web site and making this bibliography available to any and all. If you find this bibliography useful please cite it and let others know about it. If you know of anything that should be added, corrected, or changed please contact me at jpboyle@midway.uchicago.edu. In addition, any comments about this site will be helpful to future changes.

Thanks, I hope that this will be helpful.

John P. Boyle
Department of Linguistics
University of Chicago









Adelung, J. C., and Johann Severin Vater (1806-17). Mithridates oder allgemeine sprachenkunde: mit dem vater unser als sprechprobe in bey nahe funf hundert sprachen und mundarten. Berlin, Vossische Buchhandlung.

Ahenakew, F. (1987). Stories of the house people. Winnipeg, University of Manitoba Press.

Allen, L. (1931). “Siouan and Iroquoian.” IJAL 6: 185-193.

Alley, W. (1955). Coyote and buffalo.

Allison, E. H. (1897). Lakota vocabulary from Standing Rock Reservation. Bureau of American Ethnology Collection, National Anthropological Archives. N. 874. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Allison, E. H. (1899). Two Lakota texts with interlinear translations. Bureau of American Ethnology Collection, National Anthropological Archives. N. a. 3738. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Anderson, J. (1872). The newly discovered relationship of the Tuteloes to the dakotan stock. Transactions of the American Philological Society for 1871. 2: 15-6.

Anderson, B. G. (1940). Indian sleep-man tales, Bramhall House via Crown Publishers, Inc., NY, NY, 10016.

Atwater, C. (1831). Remarks made on a toure to Prairie Du Chien; thence to Washington city, in 1829, by Caleb Atwater, later commissioner employed by the United States to negotiate with the Indians of the Upper Mississippi, for the purchase of mineral country, and author of Western Antiquities. Columbus, Ohio, Issac N. Whiting.

Bancroft, G. (1838-75). History of the United States from the discovery of the American continent. Boston, Little, Brown and company.

Barker, A. E. (1886). English equivalents of words and phrases, &c., in the Mountian Stoney dialect.

Bellam, E. (1975). Studies in Stoney morphology and phonology. Linguistics. Calgary, Alberta, University of Calgary.

Berghaus, H. C. W. (1848). Physikalischer atlas oder sammlung von karten, auf denen die hauptsachlichsten erscheinungen der anorganischen und organischen natur nach ihrer geographischen verbreitung und vertheilung bildlich dargestellt sind, Gotha.

Berghaus, H. C. W. (1887). Physikalischer atlas oder sammlung von karten, auf denen die hauptsachlichsten erscheinungen der anorganischen und organischen natur nach ihrer geographischen verbreitung und vertheilung bildlich dargestellt sind.

Bierstadt, A. (1863). Lakota vocabulary. Washington, D.C., Bureau of American Ethnology Collection, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Blaine, M. R. (1979). The Ioway Indians. Norman, OK, University of Oklahoma Press.

Boas, F. (1906). Notes on the Ponka grammar. International Congress of Americanists 15, Quebec, Dussault & Proulx.

Boas, F. and E. C. Deloria (1933). “Notes on the Dakota, Teton dialect.” IJAL 7: 97-121.

Boas, F. (1937). “Some traits of the Dakota language.” Language 13: 137-41.

Boas, F. and E. C. Deloria (1941). Dakota grammar. Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences. 23, part 2.

Boaz, F. and J. R. Swanton (1911). Siouan, Dakota (Teton and Santee Dialects) with remarks on the Ponca and Winnebago. Handbook of American Indian Languages. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin. F. Boas. Washington, D.C., Smithsonian institution. 40, part 1: 879-965.

Boder, B. (1952). Joseph Robideaux genealogy & history. St. Joseph, MO.

Bolen, A. (1991). Shadows of signs: Otoe-Missouria sign language may live on in English speech: 29.

Bolen, A. L. F. (1991). Plains sign language gestures accompanying the English speech of Otoe-Missouria Indians. 11th Annual Siouan ans Caddoan languages conference, Stillwater, OK.

Bowers, N. (1996). Hidatsa suprasegmentals. Linguistics. Moscow, ID., University of Idaho.

Boyle, J. P. (1997). A preliminary examination of switch-reference in the traditional Hidatsa texts collected by Robert H. Lowie. 17th annual Siouan and Caddoan Languages Conference. Wayne, Nebraska.

Boyle, J. P. (1998). Is there a proximate / obviative system at work in Hidatsa narratives? 18th annual Siouan and Caddoan Languages Conference. Bloomington, Indiana.

Boyle, J. P. (1999). “Switch-reference and the identification of pro in Hidatsa.” Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics 24(2): 17-32.

Boyle, J. P. (1999). Switch-reference and Hidatsa clause structure. Linguistics. Chicago, University of Chicago: 1-65.

Boyle, J. P. (1999). Hidatsa clause structure. Proceedings from the 34th annual Mid-America Linguistics conference, Lawrence, Kansas, University of Kansas.

Bradbury, J. (1817). Travels in the interior of America, in the years 1809, 1810, and 1811. London, Sherwood, Neely, and Jones.

Bradshaw, D., T. Cornell, et al. (1988). Papers on the structure of Crow. Loa Angeles, UCLA.

Bradshaw, D. (1989). “The logical structure of negation in Crow (The scope of negatives in Crow).” Southwest Journal of Linguistics 9(1): 19-28.

Broadwell, G. A. T. L. C. (1988). Some problems in Crow nominalization and relativization. Congress of American Indian Languages annual meeting. Phoenix, Arizona.

Brown, J. M. (1889). English-Crow vocabulary. Bureau of American Ethnology.

Brown, R. D. (1893). “Waconda.” The Universe Review 14(5): 5.

Buechel, E., S. J. (1924). Bible history in the language of the Teton Sioux Indians. New York, Benziger Brothers.

Buechel, E., S. J. (1927). Lakota wocekiye na olowan wowapi. Sioux Indian prayer and hyme book. St. Louis, MO., Central Bureau of the Catholic Central Verein of American.

Buechel, E., S. J. (1939). A Grammar of Lakota. The language of the Teton Sioux Indians. Saint Francis Mission, SD., Rosebud Educational Society.

Buechel, E., S. J (1970). A dictionary of the Teton Dakota Sioux language: Lakota-English; English Lakota. Pine Ridge, South Dakota, Red Cloud Indian School.

Buechel, E., S.J. (1978). Lakota tales and texts. Pine Ridge, SD., Red Cloud Indian School.

Buechel, E., S. J. (1998). Lakota tales and texts. Chamberlain, SD., Tipi Press.

Bulltail, G. (1980). Baapiihaake awakaak. Pryor, MT, Crow Bible Transalation Committee.

Bushotter, G. (1887). Texts in Lakota with interlinear transalations by James Owen Dorsey. Washington, D. C., National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Carriker, E., and Robert C. Carriker, Cliford A, Carroll, and W. L. Larsen (1976). Guide to the microfilm edition of the Oregon province archives of the Society of jesus Indian language collection: The Pacific Northwest tribes. Spokane, WA, Gonzaga University.

Carter, R. T. j. (1974). Teton Dakota phonology. University of Manitoba Anthropology Papers, Winnipeg.

Carter, R. T., jr. (1980). “The Woccon language of North Carolina: its genetic affiliations and historical significance.” IJAL 46: 170-182.

Carter, R. T., jr. (1983). Root-final consonant clusters in Mandan. Napao: A Saskatchewan Anthropology Journal. M. Marino. 13: 1-4.

Carter, R. T., jr (1991). Maximilian's Ruptare vocabulary: philological evidence and Mandan phonology. Proceeding from the 1990 Mid-America Linguistics Conference, University of Kansas.

Carter, R. T., jr. (1991). Old Man Coyote and the wild potato: a trickster tale. Linguistic Studies Presented to John L. Finlay: Algonquian and Iroquoian Linguistics 8. H. C. Wolfart, University of Manitoba: 27-43.

Carter, R. T., jr. , A. W. Jones, et al. (n.d. (in progress)). Siouan Comparative Dictionary, University of Colorado, Bolder.

Carver, J. (1778). Travels through the interior parts of North-America in the years 1766,1767, and 1768. London, Printed for author; distributed by J. Walter and S. Crowder.

Catlin, G. (1841). Letters and notes on the manners, costoms, and conditions of the North American Indians, written during eight years' travel (1832-1839) amongst the wildest tribes on Indians in North America. New York, Wiley and Putnam.

Catlin, G. (1845). Notice sur les Indiens Ioways. Paris.

Chafe, W. L. (1964). “Another look at Siouan and Iroquoian.” American Anthropologist 66: 852-862.

Chafe, W. L. (1973). Siouan, Iroquoian and Caddoan. Linguistics in North America: Current Trends in Linguistics, 10. T. A. Sebeok. The hague, Mouton: 1164-1209.

Chafe, W. L. (1976). The Caddoan, Iroquoian, and Siouan families. The Hague, Mouton.

Chafe, W. (1993). Indian languages: Siouan-Caddoan. Encyclopedia of North American Colonies. New York, Scribner's. 3: 33-42.

Chamberlain, A. S. (1988). The Catawba language. Toronto, Imrie and Graham.

Chambers, J. K. (1974). khiNkhiNcha: Dakota reduplication and the identity constraint. Toronto, University of Toronto.

Chambers, J. (1978). Dakota accent. Linguistic Studies of Native Canada. E.-D. Cook and J. Kaye. Vancouver, University of British Columbia Press: 3-18.

Chambers, J. P. S. (1980). “Systematic obfuscation of morphology in Dakota.” Linguistic Inquiry 11: 325-6.

Chapman, B. (1965). The Otoes & Missourias, Times Journal Publishing Co.

Clark, A. (1943). The hen of Wahpeton. Indian Life Readers. Larwrence, Kansas, Haskell Institute, U. S. Bureau of Indain Affiars, Branch of Education.

Clark, A. (1944). Brave against the enemy. Indian Life Readers. Larwrence, Kansas, Haskell Institute Printing Department, U. S. Bureau of Indain Affiars, Branch of Education.

Clark, A. (1947). Singing Sioux cowboy reader. Indian Life Readers. Larwrence, Kansas, Bureau of Indain Affiars, Branch of Education, U.S> Indian Service.

Coberley, M. (1979). “A text analysis and brief grammatical sketch based on "Trickster challenges the Buffalo": a Mandan text collected by Edward Kennard.” Colorado Research in Linguistics 8: 19-94.

Cook, J. W. (1880-2). A study in the Yankton dialect of the Dakota. Washington, D>C>, Bureau of aamerican Ethnology Collection, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Cook, G. (1981). Emilysh isbaaaxuawaalaachisshe. Crow Agency, MT, Bilingual Materials Development Center.

Cook, E.-d. C. O. (1991). Conservative and innovative features of Alexis Stoney. Papers from the American Indian Language Conference, University of Calfornia-Santa Cruz, July and August 1991, Carbondale, Illinois: Department of Linguistics, Southern Illinois University.

Cook, E.-d. (1995). “Is there convergence in language death?: evidence from Chopewyan and Stoney.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 5: 217-31.

Corduan, W. (1974). Subordinating and coordinating particles in Lakhota. Grand Forks, ND, University of North Dakota.

Cornell, T. (1988). Ala nominals. Los Angles, University of Calfornia, Los Angles.

Coy, R. E. and M. W. Hall. (1952). The genealogy & history of the White Cloud family. St. Joseph, MO.

Crain, L. (1989). The Crow aspect system. University of Calfornia, Los Angles.

Crawford, J. M. (1975). Southeastern Indian languages. Studies in Southeastern Linguistics. J. M. Crawford. Athens, GA, University of Georgia Press.

Crow, B. M. (1979). Baapaalissuua. Crow Adgency, MT., Bilingual Materials Development Center.

Crow, B. M. (1980). Balashe Harold huuk. Crow Agency, MT, Bilingual Materials Development Center.

Crow, B. M. (1981). Iishoophilissaah. Crow Agency, MT., Bilingual Materials Development Center.

Crow, B. M. (1986). Apsaalooke bacheeitche. Crow Agency, MT., Bilingual Materials Development Center.

Curl, T. S. (1999). “The Lakhota definite articles and topic marking.” Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics 24(2): 1-16.

Curtis, E. (1930). “Oto.” The North American Indian XIX.????

Dahlstrom, A. (1982). A functional analysis of switch-reference in Lakhota. Chicago Linguistic Society, University of Chicago, Chicago, Chicago Linguistic Society.

Dailey, T. (1970). Oto Words: 12.

Dailey, T. W. (1976). Xra Hinkigrajewi: we call ourselves the Eagle (Clan).

Dailey, T. W. (1976). Otoe lands in Nebraska.

Daily, T. W. and J. D. Hopkins (1992). Native American church songs of the Otoe-Missouria and Ioway. Proceedings of the 1992 Mid-American Linguistics Conference and Conference on Siouan - Caddoan Languages, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO.

Danker, K. A. (1985). The Winnebago narratives of Felix White, Sr.: style structure and function, University of Nebraska.

de Reuse, W. J. (1981). “Grassmann's law in Ofo.” IJAL 47: 243-244.

de Reuse, W. (1981). “One hundred years of Lakota linguistics.” Kansas Working papers in Linguistics 12: 13-42.

de Reuse, W. J. (1982). “Remarks on the Lakhota enclitics.” Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics 7: 153-164.

de Reuse, W. (1990). “A supplementary bibliography of Lakota language and linguistics.” Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics 15(2): 146-66.

de Reuse, W. J. (1994). “Noun incorportation in Lakhota Siouan.” IJAL 60: 199-260.

Deloria, E. (1932). Dakota texts. American Ethnological Society. New York, Stechert. 14.

Deloria, E. C. (1954). “Short Dakota texts, including conversations.” IJAL 20: 17-22.

Densmore, F. (1918). Teton Sioux music. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin. Washington, D. C., Smithsonian Institution. 61.

Dick, B. C. (1880). Oto myths: 12.

Dorsey, J. Q. (1879-80). “How the rabbit killed the (male)winter; an Omaha fable.” American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal 2: 128-32.

Dorsey, J. O. (1880). Census of the Oto and Missouria.

Dorsey, J. O. (1880). “The rabbit and the grasshopper: an Oto myth.” American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal 3: 24-27.

Dorsey, J. O. (1880). NAA Manuscript Collection.

Dorsey, J. O. (1881). “How the rabbit caught the sun in a trap; an Omaha myth, obtained from F. LaFleche by J. Owen Dorsey.” Bureau of American Ethnology, Annual Report 1: 581-3.

Dorsey, J. O. (1882). “The sister and brother: an Iowa tradition.” American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal 4: 286-288.

Dorsey, J. O. (1885). On the comparative phonology of four Siouan languages. Bulletin of American Ethnology, Annual report. Washington, D. C., Government Printing Office: 919-929.

Dorsey, J. O. (1888). “Ponka and Omaha songs.” Journal of American Folk-Lore 2: 271-276.

Dorsey, J. O. (1888). “Omaha songs.” Journal of American Folk-Lore 1(1): 209-213.

Dorsey, J. O. (1888). Kansa texts. Manuscript Collection of the National Anthropological Archives. Washington, D. C., Smithsonian Institution.

Dorsey, J. O. (1890). The Degiha language, the speech of the Omaha and Ponka tribes of the Siouan linguistic familay of North America Indians. Contributions to North American Ethnology. Washington, D. C., U.S. Government. 6.

Dorsey, J. O. (1891). Tutelo vocabulary. Washington, D. C., National Anthropological Archives, Simthsonian Institution. 4800:337.

Dorsey, J. O. (1891). “The social organization of the Siouan tribes.” American Folklore Journal 9: ?-388.

Dorsey, J. O. (1891). “Omaha and Ponca letters.” Bureau of American Ethnology, Annual Report 11: 1-127.

Dorsey, J. O. (1892). “Siouan onomatopes.” American Anthropologist 5: 1-8.

Dorsey, J. O. (1893). The Biloxi Indians of Louisiana. Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Dorsey, J. O. (1894). “A study of Siouan cults.” Bureau of American Ethnology, 11th Annual Report: 353-544.

Dorsey, J. O. and C.Thomas (1907). “Iowa.” Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 301(1): 612-614.

Dorsey, J. O. and J. R. Swanton (1912). A dictionary of the Biloxi and Ofo Languages, accompanied with 31 Biloxi texts and numerous Biloxi phrases. Bureau of American Ethnology - Bulletin. Washington, D. C., Government Printing Office. 47.

Edmonds, R. D. (1974). The prehistory and history of the habitat of Missouria & Otoe Indians. American Indian Ethnology: Plains Indians. D. A. Horr. NY, Garland.

Edmonds, R. D. (1976). The Otoe - Missouria people. Phoenix, AZ, Indian Tribal Series.

Einaudi, P. F. (1974). A grammar of Biloxi. Linguistics. Boulder, University of Colorado.

Einaudi, P. F. (1976). A grammar of Biloxi. New York, Garland Publishing Company.

Elmendorf, W. (1963). “Yukian-Siouan lexical similarities.” IJAL 30: 300-9.

Elmendorf, W. (1964). “Item and set comparison in Yuchi, Siouan, and Yukian.” IJAL 30: 328-40.

Eschenberg, A. (2000). Multiple Level Concatenation in Omaha-Ponca. CLS 36. A. O. J. P. Boyle. Chicago, The Chicago Linguistic Society. The Panels: 89-101.

Fletcher, A. (1890). The phonetic alaphbet used by the Winnebago Indians. Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science: 38: 354-7.

Fletcher, A. (1980). “A phonetic alaphbet used by the Winnebago tribe of Indians.” Journal of American Folklore 3: 299-301.

Foster, T. (1911). The Iowa. Cedar Rapids, The Torch Press.

Frachtenberg, L. J. (1913). “Contributions to a Tutelo vocabulary.” American Anthropologist 15: 477-479.

Furbee, L. and L. A.Stanley (1975). The relevant language in Native American language planning.

Furbee, L., L. A.Stanley, et al. (1989). Lack of accommodation in a dying language. Paper presented at the 88th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC, Unpublished?

Furbee, L. and J. Hopkins (1991). The Chiwere verb word. Paper presented at the 90th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Chicago.

Gallaher, R. A. (1960). “Rantchewaime.” Palimpsest(41): 277-283.

Gallatin, A. (1836). A Synopsis of the Indian tribes within the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, and in the British and Russian possessions of North America. Transactions and Collections of the American Antiquarian Society 2. 2: 1-422.

Gatschet, A. S. (1881). Catawba field notebooks. Washinton, D.C., National Anthropological Archives, Simithsonian Institution.

Gatschet, A. S. (1900). “Grammatic sketch of the Catawba language.” American Anthropologist 2: 527-549.

Gatschet, A. S. (1902). “Onomatology of the Catawba river basin.” American Anthropologist 4: 52-56.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1965-1986). Personal collection in author's possession. Includes field notes, vocabularies, etc., of his on-going Ioway-Otoe-Missouria Language Project.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1972). Pagranaha Wawagaxe: a first book, an introduction to the Iowa-Otoe Indian language. Topeka, KS, Indian Center of Topeka.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1972). Clans and Tiospaye.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1977). Baxoje Yugwe: an Ioway sweat lodge prayer ceremony: 7.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1979). Mihxoge Wan'shige (the Berdache people).

Good Tracks, J. G. (1980). Baxoje-Jiwere Nyut'achi oral literary tradition.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1980). Psychology and genius of the Wekan - Worage.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1980). Traditional Baxoje-Jiwere-Nyut'achi Divinity.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1984). Baxoje - Jiwere Banyi: Iowa-Otoe Indian new year calendar, May 1984 - April 1985.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1985). Banyi Baxoje - Jiwere Nyut'achi: an Indian new year calendar for Iowa-Otoe- Missouria people, May 1985 - April 1986.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1989). Bear clan origin story: 7.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1992). Baxoje-Jiwere-Nyut'aji- Ma'unke: Iowa-Otoe-Missouria language. Boulder, CO., Center for the Study of the Languages of the Plains and Southwest, Department of Linguistics, University of Colorado.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1997). Wolf clan origin story: 7.

Good Tracks, J. G. (1997). Beaver clan origin story: 6.

Good Tracks, J.-I. C. N. (1997). Worageh. Ames, IA, Native Nations Press.

Gordon, R. G. (1972). “Pitch accent in Crow.” IJAL 38: 191-200.

Gordon, R. G. R. G. (1985). Crow dictionary.

Graczyk, R. (1985). Crow as an active language. Linguistics. Chicago, University of Chicago.

Graczyk, R. (1987). Switch-reference in Crow: an emergent category. Bloomington, ID, IULC.

Graczyk, R. (1990). Incorporation and cliticization in Crow morphosyntax. Linguistics. Chicago, University of Chicago.

Graczyk, R. (1991). Relative clauses in Crow. Mid-America Linguistic Conference, Lawarence, KS., University of Kansas.

Graczyk, R. (1996). Ablaut in Crow. AAA. San Francisco, CA.

Grimm, T. C. (1985). Time depth analysis of 15 Siouan languages. Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Newsletter: 11-27.

Grimm, T. C. (1987). “A comparison of Catawba with Biloxi, Mandan, and Dakota.” IJAL 53: 175-182.

Grimm, T. C. (1994). Dhegiha tribal names. Mid-America Linguistics Conference, University of Colorado, Boulder.

Haas, M. (1951). “The Proto-Gulf word for water (with notes on Siouan-Yuchi).” IJAL 17: 71-9.

Haas, M. (1952). “The Proto-Gulf word for land (with notes on Proto-Siouan).” IJAL 18: 238-40.

Haas, M. (1964). “Athapaskan, Tlingit, Yuchi, and Siouan.” IJAL 35: 495-500.

Haas, M. (1968). “The last words of Biloxi.” IJAL 34: 77-84.

Haas, M. R. (1969). “Swanton and the Biloxi and Ofo dictionaries.” IJAL 35: 286-290.

Hahn, F. (n.d.). The Ponca language.
anonymous typescript in the Gordon H. Marsh Collection in the American Philosophical Society Library, Philadelphia.

Hairy Shirt, L., et. al. (1973). Lakota woonspe wowapi. Rosebud, SD., Sinte Gleska College Center.

Hale, H. (1883). The Tutelo tribe and language. Proceedings of The American Philosophical Society.

Hale, K. J. W. E. (1981). “A preliminary meterical account of Winnebago accent.” IJAL 46: 117-32.

Hale, K. (1985). “A note on Winnebago metrical structure.” IJAL 51: 427-9.

Hall, C. L. (1898). The myth of Packs Antelope. North Dakota State Historical Society Collections. 1: 446-454.

Hamilton, R. W. and R. S. Irvin (1843). Wv-wv-kvhae e-ya e-tu u-na-ha Pa-hu-cae e-cae ae-ta-wae, mv-he-hvn-yae e-cae (etc.): An Elementary Book of the Ioway Language, with English Translations, Ioway & Sac Mission Press, Indian Territory.

Hamilton, W. and S. M. Irvin (1843). Ya-wae pa-hu-cae e-cae ae-ta-wae e-tu-hce wa-u-na-ha, Pa-hu-cae fa-kae-ku (etc.): Original Hymns, in the Ioway Language, By the Missionaries to the Ioway & Sac Indians, Ioway & Sac Mission Press, Indian Territory.

Hamilton, R. W. R. S. I. (1848). An Ioway Grammar, illustrating the principles of the Language used by the Ioway, Otoe and Missouri Indians, Prepared and printed by. B.F.Miss. of the Presbyterian Church. Ioway & Sac Mission Press, Indian Territory.

Hamilton, R. W. and R. S. Irvin (1849 & 1850). The Ioway Primer, Composed of the most common words, and arranged in alphabetic order, Ioway & Sac Mission Press.

Hamilton, W. and S. M. Irvin (1850). Ce-sus wo-ra-kae-pe ae-ta-wae, Mat-fu ae-wv-kv-hae-na-ha, a-rae kae: Six chapters of the gospel of St. Matthew in the Ioway Language, By the Missionaries to the Ioway & Sac Indians.

Hamilton, W. and S. M. Irvin (1850). We-wv-hae-kju: Some Questions, Catechism in the Ioway Language.

Hamilton, W. and S. M. Irvin (1850). Wv-ro-hae: Prayers in the Ioway Language.

Hamilton, R. W. (1854). Remarks on the Iowa Language. Information Respecting the History, Conditions & Prospects of Indian Tribes of the U.S. H.R.Schoolcraft. Philadelphia. 4: 397-406.

Hamilton, W. (n.d.). Manuscript of a portion of Genesis (unpublished): 63.

Hamp, E. P. (1958). “Prosodic notes.” IJAL 24: 321-322.

Harrias, Z. C. F. V. (1939). Hidatsa texts collected by Robert H. Lowie, with grammatical notes and phonolograph transcriptions. Indianapolis, Indiana Historical Society.

Harrington, M. R. (1913). “A visit to the Otoe Indian.” The Museum Journal, University of Pennsylvania V(3): 107-113.

Haskell, I. S. (1922). American indian legends: 10.

Hassrick, R. B. (1944). “Teton Dakota kinship system.” American Anthropologist 46.

Hayden, F. V. (1862). Contributions to the ethnography and philology of the Indian tribes of the Missouri Valley. American Philosophical Society: Transactions, n.s. Philadelphia, PA, C. Sherman and Son. 12: 231-461.

Hayden, F. (1869). Brief notes on the Pawnee, Winnebago, and Ohama languages. Proceedings from the American Philosophical Society.

Headley, R. K., Jr. (1971). The origin and distribution of the Siouan speaking tribes, Catholic University of America.

Hill, C. (1984). Cleorash iichiweekshe. Crow Agency, MT., Bilingual Materials Development Center.

Hollow, R. K., Jr. (1970). “A note on Assiniboine phonology.” IJAL 36: 196-8.

Hollow, R. C., Jr. (1971). A Mandan dictionary. Linguistics. Berkeley, University of California, Berkeley.

Hollow, R. C., Jr. & Douglas R. Parks (1980). Studies in plains linguistics: a review. Anthropology on the Great Plains. W. R. Wood and M. Liberty. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press.

Holmer, N. M. (1945). “Sonant-surds in Ponca-Omaha.” IJAL 11: 75-85.

Holmer, N. M. (1947). “An Ofo phonetic law.” IJAL 13: 1-8.

Hopkins, J. D. and L. Furbee (1980). Verbal and visual context in elicitation: 20.

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Irving, M. D. C. (1971). Oklahoma City dahe hinwinna: we traveled to Oklahoma City.

Irving, M. D. C. (1971). Nawe Unje Onnyeda: when they play handgame.

Irving, M. D. C. (1971). Topeka Raye: the name of Topeka (KS).

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Jones, A. W. (1979). “Morphological constellations in Hidatsa: locative, demonstrative, relative.” IJAL 45: 232-235.

Jones, A. W. (1983). Some archaisms and innovations in Hidatsa. Napao, A Saskatchewan anthropology journal. M. Marino. 13: 8-10.

Jones, A. W. (1983). On Proto-Siouan ablaut and nasalization: a note to follow David S. Rood's paper. Napao, A Saskatchewan anthropology journal. M. Marino. 13: 29-30.

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Jones, A. W. (1991). Why can you break things so many ways?: patterns of root extension in Siouan languages. The Belcourt Lecture; Delivered at the University of Manitoba on 8 March 1991, University of Manitoba, Voices of Rupert's Land, Winnipeg.

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Koontz, J. E. (1981). Reconstruction of the Proto-Siouan person markers. 1st Siouan & Caddoan Linguistics Conference. Boulder, CO.

Koontz, J. E. (1983). A morphologically-based reassessment of the Proto-Mississippi Valley stops and sonorants. 3rd annual Siouan & Caddoan linguistics conference. Rapid City, SD.

Koontz, J. E. (1983). Siouan syncopating *r-stems. Napao: A Saskatchewan Anthropology Journal. M. Marino. 13: 11-23.

Koontz, J. E. (1984). An association of agency and plurality in Omaha-Ponka [sic]. Read at the 4th SCLC, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Koontz, J. E. (1984). Accounting for Dakota noun stem allomorphy with fused deictic particles. Read at the 83rd Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association [AAA] (Conference on American Indian Languages [CAIL] 23), Denver, CO.
1984 AAA Abstracts, pp. 129-130

Koontz, J. E. (1984). Preliminary sketch of the Omaha-Ponca language. Linguistics. Boulder, CO., University of Colorado: 278pp.

Koontz, J. E. (1985). “A syncopating conjugation *k-stem in Lakota.” IJAL 51: 483-484.

Koontz, J. E. (1985). More sets with Taylor's PSi *rh correspondence. 5th annual Siouan and Caddoan Languages conference. Tulsa, OK.

Koontz, J. E. (1985). The typology of Mississippi Valley Siouan pronouns. Read at the 84th Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 24), Washington, DC.

Koontz, J. E. (1985). On the existence of the Mississippi Valley subgroup in the Siouan language family: 75 pp.

Koontz, J. E. (1986). Old loanwords in Mississippi Valley Siouan [archaeological implications]. Read at the 44th Annual Plains Conference, Denver, CO.

Koontz, J. E. (1986). Dakotan nominal ablaut and Proto-Mississippi Valley problem finals.
Dakota, historical, Mississippi, ablaut

Koontz, J. E. (1986). Old loanwords in Mississippi Valley Siouan [linguistic considerations]. Read at the 85th Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 25), Philadelphia, PA.

Koontz, J. E. (1987). “A reanalysis of the Biloxi causative.” Colorado Research in Linguistics 9: 28-37.

Koontz, J. E. (1987). Omaha-Ponca positionals. Read at the 7th SCLC, Boulder, CO.

Koontz, J. E. (1987). Plurality and agency in Omaha-Ponca. Read at the 86th Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 26), Chicago, IL.

Koontz, J. E. (1987). Isoglosses in Proto-Mississippi Valley Siouan. Draft of Belcourt Lecture (invited), delivered at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Koontz, J. E. (1987). Autobiography of Clifford Wolfe, Sr. [Late of Macy, NE].

Koontz, J. E. (1988). The Little Missouri river: a source of confusion for plains ethnohistory. Plains Anthropologist. 53: 439-447.

Koontz, J. E. (1988). Accent in Omaha-Ponca. Read at the 8th SCLC, Billings, MT.

Koontz, J. E. (1988). Avian loans: selected birdnames of eastern North America. Read at the 87th Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 27), Phoenix, AZ.

Koontz, J. E. (1989). Proximate/obviative in Omaha-Ponca. Read at the 9th SCLC, Morley, Alberta, Canada.

Koontz, J. E. (1989). Dakota village band names in LeSueur and related sources.

Koontz, J. E. (1989). Ordering of morphological rules in Omaha-Ponca. Read at the 88th Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 28), Washington, DC.

Koontz, J. E. (1990). Central Siouan syncopating stems. Portions read at the 10th SCLC, Lawrence, KS.

Koontz, J. E. (1991). Central Siouan syncopating *V-stems. Proceedings of the Mid America Linguistics Conference.

Koontz, J. E. (1991). Winnebago vowel length in diachronic perspective. Read at the 11th SCLC, Stillwater OK.

Koontz, J. E. (1991). 'Suddenly' in Mississippi Valley Siouan. Read at the 90th Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 30).

Koontz, J. E. (1992). The contribution of Francis LaFlesche to Dhegiha linguistics. Read at 91st Annual Meeting of the AAA.

Koontz, J. E. (1992). Comparative list of Dhegiha and Chiwere clan names.

Koontz, J. E. (1993). Mississippi Valley Siouan *stop stem datives. Read at the 13th SCLC, Boulder, CO.

Koontz, J. E. (1993). Mississippi Valley Siouan *stop stem reflexive possessives. Read at 92nd Meeting of the AAA.

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Koontz, J. E. (1994). The vowels of Chiwere-Winnebago pronominals. Read at 93rd Annual Meeting of the AAA (CAIL 32).

Koontz, J. E. (1995). Michigamea as a Siouan language. Read at the 1995 SCLC, Albuquerque, NM.

Koontz, J. E. (1995). Recognition of the unidentified and informally transcribed material included parenthetically in [JAFL XV.58, The Possum Story] as Ioway-Otoe. Preparation of transcription and translation. 1995.

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Koontz, J. E. (1996). Mississippi Valley Siouan *stop stem reflexives. Read at the 1996 Annual Meeting of the LSA (SSILA 1996 Winter Meeting).

Koontz, J. E. (1996). William Hamilton. Lexicon Grammaticorum. H. Stammerjohann. Tubingen, Max Niemeyer verlag.

Koontz, J. E. (1996). Two levels of morphology in Omaha-Ponca. Read at the 1996 SCLC, Billings, MT.

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Murray, F. (1971). Old lady and the looking glass.

Murray, F. (1971). My Ax'oinye (Man's Braid or Scalplock).

Murray, F. (1971). The lazy boy in the cattails.

Murray, F. (1971). My fast and vision experience.

Murray, F. (1971). The sweat purification prayer.

Murray, F. (1971). The red & blue drum dance or medicine lodge society.

Murray, F. (1971). The Iroshka society dance.

Murray, F. (1971). The sacred pipe.

Murray, F. (1971). Indian stick ball game.

Murray, F. (1971). Feast of the dead.

Murray, F. (1971). Sacred pipe dance: making/adoption of relatives.

Murray, F. (1971). My Indian marriage.

Murray, F. (1971). The Sauk & Fox Indian school.

Murray, F. (1972). Hinashinye Iahkida: old woman in the mirror.

Murray, F. (1972). Hinage na Chepa Wahu: the woman and the buffalo skull.

Murray, F. (1972). Nuweda Xonyitan: the twin holy boys.

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Rankin, R. (1975). Dhegiha Siouan, Algonkian, and the languages of the Southeast: some phonological convergences. Abstracts, Linguistic Society of America, Summer Meeting, Tampa, Florida, July, 1975.

Rankin, R. (1975). Some phonological evidence for Siouan-Algonkian contacts in the Ohio Valley (and points East). Linguistics Colloquy, University of Kansas, April, 1975.

Rankin, R. (1977). Quapaw (Siouan) sibilant phonetics reconstructed from four 19th century sources. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Houston, Texas, December, 1977.

Rankin, R. L. (1977). From verb to auxiliary to noun classifier and definite article: grammaticalization of the Siouan verbs 'sit', 'stand', 'lie'. Proceedings of the 1976 Mid-America Linguistic Conference, Minneapolis, MN, Univ. of Minn.

Rankin, R. (1978). Some unpublicized areal features of the Southeast (Muskogean and Siouan convergences). Abstracts from the Conference on Muskogean Languages and Linguistics. International Journal of American Linguistics, 46:1, 198O.

Rankin, R. (1978). “The unmarking of Quapaw phonology: a study of language death.” Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics 3: 45-52.

Rankin, R. (1979). Algonquian-Muskogean-Siouan counting system convergences. Abstracts, Southern Anthropological Society, Annual Meeting, Memphis, Tennessee, February, 1979.

Rankin, R. (1979). Linguistic evidence for the earlier location of the Ofo. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, December, 1979.

Rankin, R. (1980). More on the Siouan languages of the East (Saponi). Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, December, 1980.

Rankin, R. (1980). Some southeastern Siouan migrations as determined from linguistic evidence. Linguistics Colloquy, University of Kansas, February, 198O.

Rankin, R. (1981). Tutelo phonology revisited: the Sapir transcriptions. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, December, 1981.

Rankin, R. (1981). Dhegiha Siouan stop consonant correspondences and their sources. Siouan Languages Conference, Boulder, CO, June, 1981.

Rankin, R. L. (1981). “Review of Chafe 1976.” IJAL 47: 172-86.

Rankin, R. (1982). Evidence for two stop series in Biloxi. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, December, 1982.

Rankin, R. (1982). A philological analysis of phonemic aspiration in Ohio Valley Siouan languages. Linguistics Colloquy, University of Kansas, February, 1982.

Rankin, R. (1982). On the establishment of two series of stop consonants in Ofo, Biloxi and Tutelo: philological evidence. Siouan Languages Conference, Medora, ND, May, 1982.

Rankin, R. and D. Zeyrek (1982). A comparison of Siouan counting systems and numerals from 'one' to 'ten'. Proceedings from the 1982 Mid-America Linguistics Conference, Lawrence, KS.

Rankin, R. L. (1982). “A Quapaw vocabulary.” Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics 7: 125-52.

Rankin, R. L. (1982). Dhegiha (and early Siouan) conjugation types: w-stems.

Rankin, R. (1983). On some Ohio Valley Siouan and Algonquian words for 'eight'. Siouan Languages Conference, Rapid City, SD, May, 1983.

Rankin, R. (1983). Kansa regular and irregular verb conjugation patterns. Siouan Languages Conference, Rapid City, SD, May, 1983.

Rankin, R., C. H. U. o. Georgia), et al. (1984). Linguistic affiliation of Juan Pardo (and DeSoto) place names. Abstracts, Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Denver, November, 1984.

Rankin, R. (1984). Further observations on Biloxi phonology and morphology. Conference on Siouan Languages and Linguistics,, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, July, 1984.

Rankin, R. (1985). Quapaw as a Dhegiha language: grammar. Conference on Siouan and Caddoan Languages and Linguistics, Tulsa, OK, 24 May 1985.

Rankin, R. L. (1985). “On some Ohio Valley Siouan and Illinois Algonquian words for 'eight'.” IJAL 51: 544-47.

Rankin, R. and J. E. Koontz (1986). Variation in Dhegiha languages. Conference on Linguistic Variability on the Northern Plains,, Winnipeg, Manitoba, February 1986.

Rankin, R. (1986). The Kansa word list of Prince Maximilian of Wied. VI annual Conference on Siouan and Caddoan Languages and Linguistics,, Wisconsin Rapids, WI, April 1986.

Rankin, R. (1986). Quapaw and the languages of the Southeast. Mary R. Haas Festival Conference, Santa Cruz, CA, June 1986.

Rankin, R. L. (1986). Current estimates of number and status of speakers of Siouan languages.

Rankin, R. L. (1986). Quapaw-English and English-Quapaw dictionary.

Rankin, R. L. (1986). “Review of A grammar of Biloxi by Paula Ferris Einaudi.” IJAL 52: 77-85.

Rankin, R. (1987). Fricative ablaut in Siouan and Muskogean. Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Lexington, KY, April 1987.

Rankin, R. (1987). Ponca, Biloxi and Hidatsa glottal stop and Quapaw gemination as historically related accentual phenomena. VII annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference,, Boulder, CO, June 1987.

Rankin, R. L. (1987). Ponca, Biloxi, and Hidatsa glottal stops and Quapaw gemination as historically related accentual phenomena. Proceedings from the 1987 Mid-American Linguistics Conference.

Rankin, R. L. (1987). Notes on some Siouan entries in language in the Americas.

Rankin, R. L. (1987). Kansa-English and English-Kansa Dictionary.

Rankin, R. (1988). The Kansa vocabulary of Maximilian of Wied. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, November, 1988.

Rankin, R. (1988). "FH" (the origin of the Ofo aspirated fricative). VIII annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference, Billings, MT, June 1988.

Rankin, R. (1988). Language affiliations of the native people from archival narrative evidence. Symposium on the De Soto Era in Arkansas, University Museum, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, Oct. 1988.

Rankin, R. (1988). Some unexpected cases of Chiwere-Winnebago tÿ. IX annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference, Morley, Alberta, June 1989.

Rankin, R. L. (1988). On Biloxi aspiration.
Biloxi, phonology

Rankin, R. L. (1988). Quapaw: genetic and areal affiliations. In Honor of Mary Haas. W. Shipley: 629-650.

Rankin, R. L. (1989). Kansa. The Sanseido Encyclopaedia of Linguistics. T. Kamei, R. Kono and E. Chino. Tokyo, Sanseido Press. 2: 301-307.

Rankin, R. (1991). Some relic affixes in Siouan. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November, 1991.

Rankin, R. (1991). More on De Soèto's Pacaha. XIth annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics conference, Stillwater, OK, Autumn 1991.

Rankin, R. L. (1991). De Soto's Capaha: Siouan or Tunican? Proceedings of the Mid- America Linguistics Conference and Xth annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference, Lawrence, 1990, Department of Linguistics, Univ. of Kansas.

Rankin, R. (1992). Dating Siouan divisions using linguistic and (some) archaeological evidence: the cultigens speak. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia, May 1992.

Rankin, R. (1992). On Siouan chronology. 12th annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference,, Columbia, MO, Autumn1992.

Rankin, R. (1993). On Siouan chronology. Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, November, 1993.
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Rankin, R. (1993). On Siouan aspiration. 13th annual Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference,, Boulder, CO, Autumn 1993.

Rankin, R. L. (1993). Language affiliations of some de Soto place names in Arkansas. The Expedition of Hernando De Soto West of the Mississippi, 1541-1543. G. Young and M. P. Hoffman. Fayetteville, University of Arkansas Press: 210-221.

Rankin, R. L. (1993). A relic of Proto-Siouan *rò- 'one' in Mississippi Valley Siouan. American Indian Linguistics and Ethnography in Honor of Laurence C. Thompson. T. Montler and T. Mattina. Missoula, University of Montana: 471-475.

Rankin, R. (1994). Quapaw positionals. Abstracts, Mid-America Linguistics Conference,, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, October, 1994.

Rankin, R. and G. Oliverio (1994). Where does Tutelo stand? Abstracts, American Anthropological Association, Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, December, 1994.

Rankin, R. (1994). Absolute dating of Siouan linguistic splits: problems and results. Comparative Linguistics Workshop, University of Pittsburgh, April, 1994.

Rankin, R. L. (1994). Siouan languages. The Encyclopedia of Languages and Linguistics. R. E. Asher. Oxford, Pergamon Press. 7: 3954.

Rankin, R. (1994). Siouan linguistics and Oneota archaeology. Workshop on Oneota Archaeology, Iowa City, IA, March, 1994.

Rankin, R. L. (1994). On the sources and scope of Siouan aspiration. Proceedings of the 1993 Mid America Linguistics Conference, Boulder, University of Colorado Department of Linguistics.

Rankin, R. L. (1994). The Kansa vocabulary of Maximilian of Wied. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Lawrence, KS.

Rankin, R. L. (1994). On Siouan chronology.

Rankin, R. (1995). On Quapaw (and Quapaw language) origins and the town names on the Robes. "Robes of Splendor" Symposium, Arkansas Territorial Restoration, Little Rock, AR, January, 1995.

Rankin, R. (1995). On Quapaw (and Siouan) ablaut. Siouan and Caddoan Languages Conference, Linguistic Institute,, Albuquerque, NM, July 1995.

Rankin, R. (1996). Nouns to pronouns: The Siouan 1st dual and 3rd plural. SSILA abstracts, Linguistic Society of America, annual meeting handbook, San Diego, CA, January, 1996.

Rankin, R. (1996). Deeper genetic relationships in North America: a pessimist's view. Berkeley Linguistics Society, Berkeley, CA, Feb. 16, 1996, BLS.

Rankin, R. (1996). Expanded version of “Deeper genetic relationships in North America: a pessimist's view”. Comparative Linguistics Workshop, University of Pittsburgh, March, 1996.

Rankin, R. (1996). An ancient Siouan-Catawban and Yuchi noun classification system. Siouan and Caddoan Languages Conference, Billings, MT, June, 1996.

Rankin, R. L. (1996). James Owen Dorsey. Lexicon Grammaticorum. H. Stammerjohann. Tübingen, Max Niemeyer Verlag.

Rankin, R. L. (1996). Horatio Hale. Lexicon Grammaticorum. H. Stammerjohann. Tübingen, Max Niemeyer Verlag.

Rankin, R., R. T. Carter, et al. (1997). Proto-Siouan phonology, morphology and syntax. Mid-America Linguistics Conference abstracts, Columbia, MO, October 1997.

Rankin, R. (1997). The Proto-Siouan phonemic system. Siouan and Caddoan Languages Conference, Wayne State University, Wayne, NE, June 1997.

Rankin, R. (1997). Oneota, historical linguistics and the Ioway-Otoe, Missouria and Winnebago peoples. Conference on Oneota culture and archaeology. Iowa State Archaeologist's office,, Iowa City, IA, May 1997.

Rankin, R. (1997). The edge of confirmation: morphological evidence for a genetic relationship and the Macro-Siouan hypothesis. Keynote address, Atlantic Provinces Linguistic Association,, Halifax, NS Canada, November 1997.

Rankin, R. L. (1997). Proto-Siouan phonology. Siouan and Caddoan Conference, Wayne, NE.

Rankin, R. L. (1997). What was Proto-Siouan like? Mid-America Linguistics Conference, Columbia, MO.

Rankin, R. (1998). Siouan, Yuchi and the question of grammatical evidence for genetic relationship. Presidential Address, Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas. Abstracts, Linguistic Society of America, annual meeting handbook, N.Y., NY, January 1998.

Rankin, R. (1998). Siouan, Catawba, Yuchi and grammatical evidence for genetic relationship. Biennial Workshop in Comparative Linguistics, University of Pittsburgh, March, 1998.

Rankin, R. (1998). Siouan, Catawba, Yuchi genetic relationship with a note on Caddoan. 18th Siouan and Caddoan Linguistics Conference, Indiana University, Bloomington, June, 1998.

Rankin, R. L. (1998). Siouan - Yuchi: the problem of grammatical evidence for genetic relationship. SSILA Presidential Address, New York, January 1998.

Rankin, R. L. and J. E. Koontz (n.d.). Dhegiha Siouan: variation in dying languages.

Rankin, R. L. (To appear). Quapaw. The Native Languages of the Southeastern United States. H. Hardy and J. Scancarelli, University of Nebraska Press.

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Wycliffe Bible Translators (1979). Hinne Jesus ishbaaaliichiwe itcheesh bachee axpiluupe hawatam daache Mark huash alachiweesh kok [The Gospel of Mark in the Crow language]. Eastlake, CO., Crow Bible Translation Project.

Wycliffe Bible Translators (1981). Baawaalaatbaaxbe shootahchelak awakaawook. Pryor, MT., Crow Bible Translation Project.

Wycliffe Bible Translators (1991). The New Testament. Pryor, MT., Crow Bible Translation Project.

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